Updating redhat


GLib provides the core application building blocks for libraries and applications written in C.

updating redhat-14

Table of Contents: * Downloading Oracle10g Software and Burning Oracle10g CDs * Checking Memory and Swap Space * Checking /tmp Space * Checking Software Packages (RPMs) * Checking Kernel Parameters * Sizing Disk Space for Oracle10g * Creating Oracle User Accounts * Setting Shell Limits for the Oracle User * Creating Oracle Directories Optimal Flexible Architecture (OFA) for 10g (10.1.0.2) * Setting Oracle Environments * Installing Oracle10g Installing Oracle10g on a Remote Linux Server Starting Oracle Universal Installer Using Oracle Universal Installer Updates after Running Oracle Universal Installer * Oracle Post-installation Tasks Startup and Shutdown of the Oracle10g Database Shutdown of other Oracle 10g Background Processes * Tips and Hints for Oracle10g on Linux * Oracle10g/Linux Errors and Problems * References Download Oracle 10g (32-bit and 64-bit) for Linux from OTN to install linux 10g oracle: To install a Oracle Database 10g (without RAC) you only need to download the database file Disk1/stage/Components/oracle.server/10.1.0.3.0/1 Disk1/stage/Components/oracle.server/10.1.0.3.0 Disk1/stage/Components/oracle.server Disk1/stage/Components/oracle.tg/10.1.0.3.0/1/Data Files Disk1/stage/Components/oracle.tg/10.1.0.3.0/1 Disk1/stage/Components/oracle.tg/10.1.0.3.0 Disk1/stage/Components/Disk1/stage/Components/oracle.assistants.dbca/10.1.0.3.0/1/Data Files/doc.3.1Disk1/stage/Components/oracle.assistants.dbca/10.1.0.3.0/1/Data Files/...

(Drives' speed varies; you can get the dev numbers when you execute cdrecord -scanbus).

And for systems with more than 2 GB of RAM, the swap space can be between one and two times the size of RAM.

You might also want to check out Sizing Swap Space.

So it is always best to understand those systems in order to be able to properly use those system.